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Comments by YACCS
Monday, February 27, 2006

Oh my God, I agree with this guy


That's right, I'm looking at you


I am in shock. An article about blogging in which I don't have to make snarky remarks.

Blog Epitaphs? Get Me Rewrite!
Rumors of Blogs' Demise Are Exaggerated,
But a Lot Less Obsession Would Be Healthy
February 27, 2006

Maybe you've heard: Blogs are a vanishing fad -- this year's digital Pet Rock. Or a business bubble about to pop. Or a sucker's bet for new-media fame seekers.

Recent weeks have seen the rise of a cottage industry in Whither Blogging? articles. New York magazine cast cold water on newly minted bloggers' dreams with an examination of the divide between a handful of A-list blogs and countless B-list and C-list blogs that can't get much traffic no matter how hard their creators work. Slate's Daniel Gross spotlighted signs that blogs may have peaked as a business. And a much-discussed poll from Gallup concluded that growth in U.S. blog readers was "somewhere between nil and negative." From there it was off to the races, with all manner of commentators weighing in, led by the Chicago Tribune, which smirked its way through an anti-blogging editorial that got Mr. Gross's name wrong while taking odd potshots at Al Gore and snowboarding.

Reports of blogging's demise are bosh, but if we're lucky, something else really is going away: the by-turns overheated and uninformed obsession with blogging. Which would be just fine, because it would let blogging become what it was always destined to be: just another digital technology and method of communication, one with plenty to offer but no particular claim to revolution.

My bet: Within a couple of years blogging will be a term thrown around loosely -- and sometimes inaccurately -- to describe a style and rhythm of writing, as well as the tools to publish that writing. This is already happening: One of the chief problems with some chronicles of blogging's demise is their confusion about definitions, a confusion that's mirrored in efforts to measure blogs' popularity or to say anything that can apply to bloggers as a group.

Take Gallup's poll. Beyond flat to declining blog traffic, it found just 9% of Internet users read blogs frequently, 11% do so occasionally, 13% rarely bother, and 66% never do. And "reading blogs" ranked last in a list of 13 common Internet activities, below things like emailing, checking news and weather, and shopping.


So, the real world things I do come before reading? No shit.

But I wonder if people realize what blogs are. I think a lot of people read them and have no idea that they have a specific name. Daily Candy and Wonkette and Gawker are no different than Page Six or Lucky and there isn't that segregation between the two.

My feeling that a lot of people read things which bloggers consider blogs and have no idea that they are specifically blogs.

posted by Steve @ 5:49:00 PM

5:49:00 PM

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